How to Get Rid of Bad Breath

Everyone experiences bad breath at one time or another, and many people suffer from chronic bad breath. My Guest Poster this week offers the reasons and solutions for that pesky problem. I am so pleased to have Darla Scheidt from Grove Dental Associates share her expertise.

If you are one of the 80 million Americans suffering from bad breath, then you know just how embarrassing it can be. Clinically known as halitosis, chronic bad breath can wreak havoc on one’s self-esteem, close friendships and professional life. But the good news is that you don’t have to live with it. Consider the following causes of halitosis as well as tips to restore your fresh breath — and self-confidence — once and for all.

What’s causing your bad breath?

Many factors can trigger bad breath with the most common being improper or infrequent brushing and flossing. Bad breath typically originates in the mouth due to bacterial buildup. As the bacteria multiply on the tongue, teeth and gums, it emits foul odors that result in unpleasant breath.

 

The first step to keeping bad breath at bay is to identify the cause, which may include one or more of the following.

 

  • Poor oral hygiene. Most cases of bad breath are caused by poor oral hygiene. If you don’t brush and floss your teeth after every meal, pieces of food can collect between your teeth and around your gums and tongue to foster bacteria that produces unpleasant odors. Brushing and flossing daily is the best way to reduce the amount of food particles that linger in your mouth and cause bad breath.
  • Gum disease. Persistent bad breath can also be an early sign for gum disease, which is caused by plaque — a sticky, colorless film of bacteria that forms on the teeth. Because gum disease can cause serious health problems, including pain, bone loss and tooth loss, it’s important to understand other warning signs and discuss them with your dentist.
  • Tobacco use. As if using tobacco didn’t already cause enough harm to one’s overall health, smoking and other tobacco products can cause foul-smelling mouth odor. In addition to unpleasant smoker’s breath, tobacco use can increase your risk of dry mouth, gum disease and other oral infections—all of which cause bad breath and lead to other health problems.

 

  • Foods. Certain beverages and foods, like garlic, onions, alcohol and coffee, are more powerful smelling than others and commonly produce unpleasant breath for several hours after ingestion.

 

  • Dry mouth. Your mouth requires saliva to rinse away debris left behind after a meal. Otherwise, when your mouth is too dry, food particles and bacteria will linger on your teeth and gums, leading to dental problems that contribute to bad breath. Because saliva production is reduced during sleep, many people experience “morning breath” upon waking each day.

 

  • Medical conditions. A person’s bad breath is not always the result of bacteria buildup. In some cases it can be a symptom of an illness such as chronic sinus infections, diabetes, gastrointestinal issues, bronchitis, or liver or kidney ailments. To improve bad breath, your physician should first address the underlying illness.

Tips to improve bad breath

In many cases, halitosis can be remedied by making simple lifestyle changes. In addition to a diligent oral hygiene regimen, there are many easy ways to eliminate bad breath including the following.

 

  • Rinse your mouth with water after eating to remove food debris and bacteria.
  • Chew sugarless gum to stimulate saliva production, which naturally rinses away odor-causing bacteria.
  • Snack on crisp, healthy foods, like celery, carrots or apples, which cleanse teeth and loosen food particles from between teeth.
  • Brush your tongue as a part of your daily oral hygiene.
  • Identify and avoid foods that trigger your bad breath.
  • Drink plenty of water throughout the day to keep your mouth moist and clean, especially if you already suffer from dry mouth.
  • If you wear dentures, removable braces or bridges, clean them thoroughly at least once a day.
  • Brush your teeth after every meal for at least two minutes.
  • Keep a portable toothbrush on hand throughout the day to keep breath fresh at work or when out with friends.
  • Don’t forget to floss at least once a day as an essential way to remove hard-to-reach food particles from between teeth.
  • If you smoke or use other tobacco products, take steps to quit as an important means to get rid of bad breath and improve your health.
  • Visit your dentist at least twice a year for a professional exam and cleaning.

 

Tired of popping mints and avoiding friends? You don’t have to live with halitosis. Start by identifying the culprit of your bad breath, improving your oral hygiene and making necessary lifestyle changes for fresher breath. If your halitosis persists, even after taking steps to eliminate it, talk to your dentist for an assessment of your breath’s origin. Your unpleasant breath could be a sign of something other than poor oral hygiene or bad habits.

 

Author Bio:

 

Darla Scheidt works at Grove Dental Associates as the Marketing Director. Grove Dental is a multi-specialty group dental practice in the Western suburbs of Chicago. With over 30 doctors and in business for over 40 years, Grove Dental’s offices stay on the cutting edge of the dental industry.

 

 

 

 

 

Dress For Success: The Clothing – Mood Connection

Its no secret that I am a stay-at-home mom, but I also run a few family businesses. Luckily all these “jobs” require a very casual wardrobe. And by casual, I mean sweats, tee shirts, jeans, tennis shoes, baseball caps on days when I don’t have time to do my hair… etc.

Fridays are generally my day off from my project management role, so I will run a few errands and get sh*# done.  This Friday, I had an appointment so I dressed fairly professionally. After the appointment I ran a few errands. It was the strangest thing. Every person I encountered was really nice. Not to say that people aren’t usually nice, but each store clerk was more than friendly and helpful. Strangers were saying HI, it was a great day. Maybe because it was Friday??? Maybe because I didn’t look like homeless person or gym rat casing the joint.

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Okay, so I am a little obsessed with Robin Wright and House of Cards

Clothes have their own way of communicating, and how a person dresses can speak volumes about self-identification, image, and personality.  Clothing choices can inspire confidence in others, and play a part in that oh so important first impression (no flip flops on the job interview).

We hear it all the time, don’t judge a book by its cover, but clothes make the man (and woman),so dressing for success may be the winner in this debate, and a great excuse to go buy something new.

Clothing is important for self-esteem, since it can allow us to feel more assertive, confident, and comfortable in a given situation. And research suggests that individuals with low self-esteem can use appearance to help restore their self-confidence .

Because clothes and mood are inter-related, different types of clothing can be either positive or negative, so a wardrobe can be the secret to looking good and feeling great. Emotions are attached to clothes, and what we wear can be a great mood boosting tool, or even a mood masking one (feeling blue, a bright red shirt may be just the way to go).  

Whether a millennial or octogenarian, clothes can gear up a person’s mood with a new style, comfort factor, nice fabric quality, print, color, brand, and even a great fit.  Dressing for success can not only boost self-confidence, but can even make an individual seem more trustworthy; no one wants to be greeted by a doctor in shorts and a tank top.  And women are more likely to remember a man’s attire, so men take note; it’s time to polish up that look in order to meet the hottie at the bar, the gym, or the next cubicle over.  

Dress for success to boost self-confidence and take control of the message that those clothes are sending.  And as Mark Twain says — naked people have little or no influence on society.

The Foolproof Way To Get Back On Track When You Blow Your Diet

I was at the gym today on the treadmill listening to the two guys next to me lament about their ups and downs of weight loss. One of the guys had lost over 100 pounds several different times, which also means that he has gained over 100 pounds several times.

There is nothing as overwhelming as seeing that scale start to creep up. It happens to everyone, but how far you let the creep continue is up to you.

Scale creep happens because of the small, daily decisions, ones that you thought were just a big dinner, or a skipped workout were explained away in your mind as isolated incidents. But they are not. The little things add up, and they can add up fast if you don’t pay attention.

Gaining weight back is a similar path to how you took the weight off. When you lost one or two pounds a week, you made daily accountability decisions and choices that resulted in weight loss. Maybe it was your daily or weekly weigh-in on the scale, maybe it was your big salad for lunch, or pulling out your jeans to see if they fit yet. All of those little changes, those small decisions added up to your weight loss.

Gaining weight back follows a similar pattern. Remember, you didn’t lose the weight in a measured exact way of three pounds per week every week, and you don’t gain it the same way. It usually starts with one little trigger.

The Fourth of July bash and your birthday only a week apart … YIKES. One little trigger, for example an over the top meal: a big steak, baked stuffed potato, a little of the crab appetizer and the chocolate cheesecake, topped with drink after drink in celebration. You feel so lethargic the next day, which I call a food hangover, that you break your normal oatmeal/blueberry morning and you have a cup of coffee and a croissant just to function the next day and curb your food withdrawal.

Since you “messed up” breakfast, you say “screw” it to lunch and have the pizza you’ve been missing. Once you’ve had the pizza for lunch, you think, might has well have the fried chicken for dinner because I’ve totally blown it. What’s one more meal?

Maybe your scale ran out of batteries and you don’t have that accountability that you’ve been so diligent about when you lost weight. You just stop weighing in because you no longer have your scale. Two weeks go by and you’re so scared of seeing what that number will be, you go another week without weighing in. Three weeks turn into four and the pounds continue to pile on.

It can be as simple as wearing comfy sweats for 4 days in a row. They feel so big and roomy, that you eat an extra muffin and you think, wow, I must be doing great because everything still fits! (I’ve done that one myself, many times, then I finally “wake up”, pull up my jeans and say, ughh!!!! What was I thinking!?!??).

It’s all those little decisions, the same daily decisions you made when you were losing weight, that result in adding the pounds back.

The most FOOLPROOF to get back on track is to commit to one good day.

If one good day seems overwhelming , commit to one good meal. Just one. If you have already blown breakfast, then make your lunch your “on track” option … something that will give you energy, make you feel great, and give you the confidence that you can do it. Often, just one positive decision, one good lunch, one good run, can give you the jolt you crave to shake it up and get you back on the track of losing the weight. You don’t drown by falling in the water. You drown by staying there. Get out of the water and get back on track!

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